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The Epidemic of the Exploitation of Victims to Sex Trafficking in Asia – Final Paper ( RA 5)

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There is a global issue spreading rapidly that attention needs to be called to, affecting the human population in the shadows. Sex trafficking has again and again, become a reoccurring problem, especially in the larger cities, behind closed doors. This is exploitation of men, women, and children for sexual use almost in ‘slave like conditions’. Sex trafficking is not a matter of will, rather a matter of force. Most individuals are taken, kidnapped, lead or even sold into trafficking in this respect. In Asia, this matter is growing rapidly every day, in the major hubs of Asia such as Tai Wan, Vietnam, or Hong Kong. Many people are working hard to prevent sex trafficking and locate the trade. The goal is to end sex trafficking and the ideology of modern day slavery, except the object desired is not labor, but human sexuality. Sex Trafficking in Asia is a modern-day product of human enslavement that has begun to occur in mid-1900’s to present day, rooted from slave trade and continually allows a line to be drawn in between human rights and justice.

The issue of sex trafficking in Asia, has increasingly become a rising epidemic as the industry has grown and especially in the recent decades. Preying on children, young men and women, and travelers whom are then forced into situations of rape, abuse, torture, and even death. The struggle for dominance has always been an issue, the desire to have complete control over places or people has been an ingrained behavior humans. Across the globe there a variety of different forms of dominance have occurred such as war, slavery, and rape. Asia is by far the most populated continent on Earth with many countries and cities being overfilled, only making the chances for control over others that much easier. Individuals that are lead into sex trafficking are rather victims or slaves as they are being dominated over. Actions humans do are all stemmed from the motivation of control and security which sex trafficking provides in terms of profit or being sold and sexual fulfillment which is another human desire. The roots of sex trafficking are deeply correlated in the components of slave trade.

 

The origins of sex trafficking are found within the most well-known form of globalization and human control, slave trade.  An example of this was Between the 1600-1800’s people from Africa were captured, beaten, raped and sold into slavery across the globe this was known as the Slave Codes. Slaves were given no rights and were treated as objects, similar to victims of sex trafficking. Rape was a common tool of dominance used within slavery perpetrated by slave owners or the crews of the ships people were sent on. Over time as human rights have developed, the practice of slave trade itself has died off but its characteristics still live on. The Bill titled ‘Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery’ speaks to this fact regarding slavery falling into disuse under article 6. “The act of enslaving another person or of inducing another person to give himself or a person dependent upon him into slavery, or of attempting these acts, or being accessory thereto, or being a party to a conspiracy to accomplish any such acts, shall be a criminal offence under the laws of the States Parties to this Convention and persons convicted thereof shall be liable to punishment” [1].  The concept of buying humans for labor has evolved into a more accepted action of buying or trading them for sexual purposes, consensually or not. Controlling people based on race or gender is still common and is often an accepted notion. Sex trafficking is a very real issue in society and has been around and an evolving epidemic in the recent decades.

Figure 1 : Women as Objects for sale with Sex Trafficking

Sex trafficking has been a rising ordeal that is now starting to become a prevalent and talked about issue globally. The numbers of individuals and occurrences of incidents are stacking up to astronomical amounts across the world and especially in Asia, Annie George and her co-authors explain this statistic in their article ‘Sex trafficking and sex work: Definitions, Debates and Dynamics’ saying,The United Nations estimates the number of trafficking victims at more than 30 million, with the largest number originating in Asia, and estimated 1,500,000 annually in South Asia alone”   [2].  The Asian population is so densely squeezed across the continent that cities and so many crimes happen at once that sex traffickers are almost never caught. The majority of targets are women and children, and also tourists who are not familiar with their surroundings. The article continues to say “around 8,000,000 women and children are trafficked each year across international borders; 80% of trafficked persons end up in forced sex work” [2]. Sex trafficking is to be considered a modern day version of slavery that is sexually dehumanizing and objectifying individuals based on the need for control over others.

The industry of sex trafficking itself has changed over the course time hiding in the shadows but realistically coming to light. As sex trafficking has evolved its particular characteristics and facts have changed as well. Methods and tactics have changed overtime on how to lure, control and abuse victims, particularly women, in Asia. Technology and modern social media is being used to attract sex workers which has been a more recent device. S. Huda touches on this is his article ‘Sex Trafficking in South Asia’, “Increasing the use of technology to market women and children for prostitution, bride trade, pornography, and other slave like practices via the internet” [3].  Also, women who have experienced abuse in their past are often targeted by sex traffickers as they are less likely to resist harm. “Increased trafficking of women and girls from ethnic and minority groups who are very often also experiencing abuse in their communities and /or caught in conflicts of war” [3].  Sexually transmitted diseases and abortions in result of sex trafficking are becoming more of known fact as less preventive measures are being taken. Michele R. Decker and her fellow co-authors express in their article, ‘Sex trafficking, sexual risk, sexually transmitted infection and reproductive health among female sex workers in Thailand’, that “Compared with their non-trafficked counterparts, sex-trafficked FSWs were more likely to have experienced sexual violence” [4]. Women and children in Asia are being deceptively drawn into and pushed to enter the sex trafficking industry more and more as industry grows and grows.

Figure 2: Advertisement Encouraging Women to Find Work Abroad- But realistically a scheme to lure into the sex trafficking industry

Globally sex trafficking can look different in varying cultures as it can mean different things and hold different weights in that societies standards. Sex trafficking in the United States versus Asia is equally of importance but can is seen with less seriousness. Western ideals and beauty standards completely uphold the idea of sexual exploitation, especially among women and victims of rape are often not taken seriously. Women have always been made to be seen as sexual objects for the man to enjoy, T.C. Esselstyn comments on this matter in his article ‘Prostitution in the United States’, “Prostitution became a fixture on the moving frontier, where the genuine pioneer woman was a prostitute. Some cities such as Gavelston, Chicago, and New Orleans, acquired an international fame for their number and variety in prostitutes” [5]. The mentality of many people in the U.S. is that women bring the fate of rape unto themselves even if she is forced in sex work. Also in the United States the after effects of sex trafficking is easier to deal with such as having an abortion as an acceptable option to some degree or ability to have medication for a sexually transmitted disease. Many countries in Asia cannot or will not allow this kind of medical treatment as it not culturally moral. No matter where someone derives from sexual abuse should never be morally tolerated.

The key to putting a stop to sex trafficking is to first realize the problem and fight back. Asia has the highest concentration of sexual exploitation and the countries within have begun taking action. As stated in the Vietnam News article ‘UN Project Combats Human Trafficking in Southeast Asia’, “Viet Nam has implemented a National Plan of Action against trafficking in persons and endorsed a national anti-trafficking law” [6]. Vietnam is one of the first countries to begin addressing the serious matter of the modern form of human enslavement. The article continues, “UN-ACT will work closely with governments, civil society, academic and research organizations, as well as the private sector, to strengthen policy and operational responses to human trafficking in the Greater Mekong Sub-region and beyond” [6]. One fight, one country, and then eventual one continent will wage a war to end the fight against modern human enslavement.

Figure 3: Map of Asia where the Progression of Activism to End Sex Trafficking

The scar of slavery is a wound that will always be prevalent on humanity, it has shaped how world relationships have formed and how human equalities have been unlevel. Slavery in human history has created the blue prints and thirst for domination which fuels the prevalence of injustice among humans. Sex trafficking is a method of power used to control victims for the need of domination and economic presence globally. Asia is the largest continent, with some of the most booming cities in the world that can accommodate this lust for power. Sex Trafficking needs to be stopped in Asia, at one of the biggest hubs internationally which will put major impact on global sexual slavery. The implications of sex trafficking only bring negative physical and emotional effects to the human race and needs to ends so world relations can progress.

 

 

 

 

Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similiar to Slavery. Yale Law School, 1956.

[1] Yale Law School, Supplementary Convention, 1.

George, Annie, U. Vindhya, and Sawmya, Ray. “Sex Trafficking and Sex Work: Definitions, Debates and Dynamics — A Review of Literature.” Economic and Political Weekly 45, no. 17 (April 24-30, 2010): 64-73. Accessed February 27, 2017. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25664387

[2] George, Vindhya, and  Sawmya, Sex Trafficking and Sex Work,  64-73

Huda, S. “Sex Trafficking in South Asia.” International Journal of Gynecology and Obsestrics. 94 (2006): 374-381. Acceseed March 21, 2017. http://childtrafficking.com/Docs/huda2006_oct07.pdf

[3] Huda, Sex Trafficking, 374-381.

Silverman, Jay G., Decker R.Michele, McCauley L. Heather, Phuengsamra, Dusita, and Janyam, Surang. “Sex trafficking, sexual risk, sexually transmitted infection and reproductive health among female sex workers in Thailand .” Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 65, no. 4 (April 2011): 334-339. Accessed February 27, 2017. http://www.jstor.org/stable/41150977

[4] Silverman et al., Sex Trafficking, 334-339.

Esselstyn, T.C. “Prostitution in the United States.” The American Academy of Political and Social Science. Vol. 376 (March, 1968): 123-135. Accessed March, 21, 2017. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1037808

[5] Esselstyn, Prostitution, 123-135.

UN project combats human trafficking is Southeast Asia. ” Provincial , May 14, 2014.  Accessed January 19, 2017. http://search.proquest.com/docview/154165791? accountid=14902

[6] UN Project,  1.

Snyder, Paul. Prostitution in Asia. Vol.10.Series 2. Taylor and Francis Ltd, 1974.

[7] Snyder, Prostitution.

Illustrations

Figure 1 : Women as Objects for sale with Sex Trafficking

https://www.google.com/search?q=sex+trafficking+in+asia&hl=en&authuser=0&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj0qeLvmsbTAhUJ6GMKHb0wBnUQ_AUICygC&biw=1821&bih=868#imgrc=CLhNM7bvWa-ryM:&spf=283

Figure 2: Advertisement Encouraging Women to Find Work Abroad

https://www.google.com/search?q=sex+trafficking+in+asia&hl=en&authuser=0&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj0qeLvmsbTAhUJ6GMKHb0wBnUQ_A

UICygC&biw=1821&bih=868#imgrc=cTzbuMur7XGNXM:&spf=297

Figure 3:  Map of Asia where the Progression of Activism to End Sex Trafficking

https://www.google.com/search?q=sex+trafficking+in+asia&hl=en&authuser=0&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj0qeLvmsbTAhUJ6GMKHb0wBnUQ_AUICygC&biw=1821&bih=868#imgrc=KbkrJrFPDiG88M:&spf=306

The Epidemic Effects of Sex Trafficking in Asia

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There is a global issue spreading rapidly that attention needs to be called to, affecting the human population in the shadows. Sex trafficking has again and again, become a reoccurring problem, especially in the larger cities, behind closed doors. This is exploitation of men, women, and children for sexual use almost in ‘slave like conditions’. Sex trafficking is not a matter of will, rather a matter of force. Most individuals are taken, kidnapped, lead or even sold into trafficking in this respect. In Asia, this matter is growing rapidly every day, in the major hubs of Asia such as Tai Wan, Vietnam, or Hong Kong. Many people are working hard to prevent sex trafficking and locate the trade. The goal is to end sex trafficking and the ideology of modern day slavery, except the object desired is not labor, but human sexuality.

The issue of sex trafficking in Asia, has increasingly become an issue as the industry as this has grown and especially in the recent decades. Preying on children, young men and women, and travelers whom are then forced into situations of rape, abuse, torture, and even death. The struggle for dominance has always been an issue, the desire to have complete control over places or people has been an ingrained behavior humans. Across the globe there a variety of different forms of dominance have occurred such as war, slavery, and rape. Asia is by far the most populated continent on Earth with many countries and cities being overfilled, only making the chances for control over others that much easier. Individuals that are lead into sex trafficking are rather victims or slaves as they are being dominated over. Actions humans do are all stemmed from the motivation of control and security which sex trafficking provides in terms of profit or being sold and sexual fulfillment which is another human desire. The roots of sex trafficking are deeply correlated in the components of slave trade.

The origins of sex trafficking are found within the most well-known form of globalization and human control, slave trade.  An example of this was Between the 1600-1800’s people from Africa were captured, beaten, raped and sold into slavery across the globe this was known as the Slave Codes. Slaves were given no rights and were treated as objects, similar to victims of sex trafficking. Rape was a common tool of dominance used within slavery perpetrated by slave owners or the crews of the ships people were sent on. Over time as human rights have developed, the practice of slave trade itself has died off but its characteristics still live on. The Bill titled ‘Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery’ speaks to this fact regarding slavery falling into disuse under article 6. “The act of enslaving another person or of inducing another person to give himself or a person dependent upon him into slavery, or of attempting these acts, or being accessory thereto, or being a party to a conspiracy to accomplish any such acts, shall be a criminal offence under the laws of the States Parties to this Convention and persons convicted thereof shall be liable to punishment” [6].  The concept of buying humans for labor has evolved into a more accepted action of buying or trading them for sexual purposes, consensually or not. Controlling people based on race or gender is still common and is often an accepted notion. Sex trafficking is a very real issue in society and has been around and an evolving epidemic in the recent decades.

Sex trafficking has been a rising ordeal that is now starting to become a prevalent and talked about issue globally. The numbers of individuals and occurrences of incidents are stacking up to astronomical amounts across the world and especially in Asia, Annie George and her co-authors explain this statistic in their article ‘Sex trafficking and sex work: Definitions, Debates and Dynamics’ saying, “The United Nations estimates the number of trafficking victims at more than 30 million, with the largest number originating in Asia, and estimated 1,500,000 annually in South Asia alone” [2].  The Asian population is so densely squeezed across the continent that cities and so many crimes happen at once that sex traffickers are almost never caught. The majority of targets are women and children, and also tourists who are not familiar with their surroundings. The article continues to say “around 8,000,000 women and children are trafficked each year across international borders; 80% of trafficked persons end up in forced sex work” [2]. Sex trafficking is to be considered a modern day version of slavery that is sexually dehumanizing and objectifying individuals based on the need for control over others.

The industry of sex trafficking itself has changed over the course time hiding in the shadows but realistically coming to light. As sex trafficking has evolved its particular characteristics and facts have changed as well. Methods and tactics have changed overtime on how to lure, control and abuse victims, particularly women, in Asia. Technology and modern social media is being used to attract sex workers which has been a more recent device. S. Huda touches on this is his article ‘Sex Trafficking in South Asia’, “Increasing the use of technology to market women and children for prostitution, bride trade, pornography, and other slave like practices via the internet” [3].  Also, women who have experienced abuse in their past are often targeted by sex traffickers as they are less likely to resist harm. “Increased trafficking of women and girls from ethnic and minority groups who are very often also experiencing abuse in their communities and /or caught in conflicts of war” [3].  Sexually transmitted diseases and abortions in result of sex trafficking are becoming more of known fact as less preventive measures are being taken. Michele R. Decker and her fellow co-authors express in their article, ‘Sex trafficking, sexual risk, sexually transmitted infection and reproductive health among female sex workers in Thailand’, that “Compared with their non-trafficked counterparts, sex-trafficked FSWs were more likely to have experienced sexual violence” [4]. Women and children in Asia are being deceptively drawn into and pushed to enter the sex trafficking industry more and more as industry grows and grows.

Globally sex trafficking can look different in varying cultures as it can mean different things and hold different weights in that societies standards. Sex trafficking in the United States versus Asia is equally of importance but can is seen with less seriousness. Western ideals and beauty standards completely uphold the idea of sexual exploitation, especially among women and victims of rape are often not taken seriously. Women have always been made to be seen as sexual objects for the man to enjoy, T.C. Esselstyn comments on this matter in his article ‘Prostitution in the United States’, “Prostitution became a fixture on the moving frontier, where the genuine pioneer woman was a prostitute. Some cities such as Gavelston, Chicago, and New Orleans, acquired an international fame for their number and variety in prostitutes” [1]. The mentality of many people in the U.S. is that women bring the fate of rape unto themselves even if she is forced in sex work. Also in the United States the after effects of sex trafficking is easier to deal with such as having an abortion as an acceptable option to some degree or ability to have medication for a sexually transmitted disease. Many countries in Asia cannot or will not allow this kind of medical treatment as it not culturally moral. No matter where someone derives from sexual abuse should never be morally tolerated.

The key to putting a stop to sex trafficking is to first realize the problem and fight back. Asia has the highest concentration of sexual exploitation and the countries within have begun taking action. As stated in the Vietnam News article ‘UN Project Combats Human Trafficking in Southeast Asia’, “Viet Nam has implemented a National Plan of Action against trafficking in persons and endorsed a national anti-trafficking law” [7]. Vietnam is one of the first countries to begin addressing the serious matter of the modern form of human enslavement. The article continues, “UN-ACT will work closely with governments, civil society, academic and research organizations, as well as the private sector, to strengthen policy and operational responses to human trafficking in the Greater Mekong Sub-region and beyond” [7]. One fight, one country, and then eventual one continent will wage a war to end the fight against modern human enslavement.

 

Esselstyn, T.C. “Prostitution in the United States.” The American Academy of Political and Social Science. Vol. 376 (March, 1968): 123-135. Accessed March, 21, 2017. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1037808

[1] Esselstyn, Prostitution, 123-135.

George, Annie, U. Vindhya, and Sawmya, Ray. “Sex Trafficking and Sex Work: Definitions, Debates and Dynamics — A Review of Literature.” Economic and Political Weekly 45, no. 17 (April 24-30, 2010): 64-73. Accessed February 27, 2017. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25664387

[2] George, Vindhya, and  Sawmya, Sex Trafficking and Sex Work,  64-73.

Huda, S. “Sex Trafficking in South Asia.” International Journal of Gynecology and Obsestrics. 94 (2006): 374-381. Acceseed March 21, 2017. http://childtrafficking.com/Docs/huda2006_oct07.pdf

[3] Huda, Sex Trafficking, 374-381.

 

Silverman, Jay G., Decker R.Michele, McCauley L. Heather, Phuengsamra, Dusita, and Janyam, Surang. “Sex trafficking, sexual risk, sexually transmitted infection and reproductive health among female sex workers in Thailand .” Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 65, no. 4 (April 2011): 334-339. Accessed February 27, 2017. http://www.jstor.org/stable/41150977

[4] Silverman et al., Sex Trafficking, 334-339.

Snyder, Paul. Prostitution in Asia. Vol.10.Series 2. Taylor and Francis Ltd, 1974.

[5] Snyder, Prostitution.

Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similiar to Slavery. Yale Law School, 1956.

[6] Yale Law School, Supplementary Convention, 1.

UN project combats human trafficking is Southeast Asia. ” Provincial , May 14, 2014.  Accessed January 19, 2017. http://search.proquest.com/docview/154165791? accountid=14902

[7] UN Project,  1.

Revised RA #3- Epidemic of sex trafficking in Asia

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Hook: There  is a global issue spreading rapidly that attention needs to be called to, affecting the human population in the shadows. Sex trafficking has again and again become a reoccurring problem, especially in the larger cities, behind closed doors. This is exploitation of men, women, and children for sexual use almost in ‘slave like conditions’. Sex trafficking is not a matter of will, rather a matter of force. Most individuals are taken, kidnapped, lead or even sold into trafficking in this respect. In Asia, this matter is growing rapidly everyday, the major hubs of Asia such as Tai Wan, Vietnam, or Hong Kong. Many are working hard to prevent sex trafficking and locate the trade, “HA NOI, A five-year regional project to fight human trafficking across Southeast Asia was launched in Ha Noi.” The goal is to end sex trafficking and the ideology of modern day slavery, except the object desired is not later but human sexuality.

Thesis: Sex Trafficking in Asia, specifically in the major cities,  has increasingly become an industry that is an epidemic in the recent decades that preys on  children, young men and women, and travelers and forces them into situations of rape, abuse, torture, and even death.

Paragraph 3: The history and evolution of sex trafficking and where it derived from such as slave trade internationally [4]

Paragraph 4:  analysis of facts and Statistics of Sex Trafficking, where the biggest on goings of sex trafficking occur as well[1]

Paragraph 5:  analysis of how sex trafficking has changed over the course of the last few decades and what it entails, the tactics, groups of sex traffickers, and how people are sold into sex trafficking[2]

Paragraph 6: Comparison of sex trafficking in south Asia and the United States [5]

Conclusion: Sex Trafficking is relevant in today’s society because it is still prevalent issue going on in most countries around the world. The Asian continent is one of the heaviest populated places on Earth so naturally it is breeding ground for trouble. Everyday individuals are taken, lured, and misguided into the crevices of society in Asian culture to be sexually abused and raped against their will. The idea of exchanging sexual actions for money is bad enough, but forcing individuals into an industry of sexual dominated patriarchy is the worst form of slavery there is.

George, Annie, U. Vindhya, and Sawmya, Ray. “Sex Trafficking and Sex Work: Definitions, Debates and Dynamics — A Review of Literature.” Economic and Political Weekly 45, no. 17 (April 24-30, 2010): 64-73. Accessed February 27, 2017. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25664387

[1] George, Vindhya, and  Sawmya, Sex Trafficking and Sex Work,  64-73.

Silverman, Jay G., Decker R.Michele, McCauley L. Heather, Phuengsamra, Dusita, and Janyam, Surang. “Sex trafficking, sexual risk, sexually transmitted infection and reproductive health among female sex workers in Thailand .” Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 65, no. 4 (April 2011): 334-339. Accessed February 27, 2017. http://www.jstor.org/stable/41150977

[2] Silverman et al., Sex Trafficking, 334-339.

Snyder, Paul. Prostitution in Asia. Vol.10.Series 2. Taylor and Francis Ltd, 1974.

[3] Snyder, Prostitution.

Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similiar to Slavery. Yale Law School, 1956.

[4] Yale Law School, Supplementary Convention, 1.

UN project combats human trafficking is Southeast Asia. ” Provincial , May 14, 2014.  Accessed January 19, 2017. http://search.proquest.com/docview/154165791? accountid=14902

[5] UN Project,  1.

Revised Geographic Focus: Thailand, South Asia, Japan

Revised Search Terms: human trafficking, southeast asia, prostitution, sex trafficking, rape, Asians, sex workers

Revised Date Limiter: 1960-1979

Revised Historical Question: How has sex trafficking evolved throughout history in Asia and what are the key differences and affects between sex trafficking and prostitution?

LRA #3 Sex Trafficking Epidemic In Asia

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Hook: There  is a global issue spreading rapidly that attention needs to be called to, affecting the human population in the shadows. Sex trafficking has again and again become a reoccurring problem, especially in the larger cities, behind closed doors. This is exploitation of men, women, and children for sexual use almost in ‘slave like conditions’. Sex trafficking is not a matter of will, rather a matter of force. Most individuals are taken, kidnapped, lead or even sold into trafficking in this respect. In Asia, this matter is growing rapidly everyday, the major hubs of Asia such as Tai Wan, Vietnam, or Hong Kong. Many are working hard to prevent sex trafficking and locate the trade, “HA NOI, A five-year regional project to fight human trafficking across Southeast Asia was launched in Ha Noi.” The goal is to end sex trafficking and the ideology of modern day slavery, except the object desired is not later but human sexuality.

Thesis: Sex Trafficking in Asia, specifically in the major cities,  has increasingly become an industry that is an epidemic in the recent decades that preys on  children, young men and women, and travelers and forces them into situations of rape, abuse, torture, and even death.

Paragraph 3: The history and evolution of sex trafficking and where it derived from such as slave trade internationally

Paragraph 4:  analysis of facts and Statistics of Sex Trafficking, where the biggest on goings of sex trafficking occur as well

Paragraph 5:  analysis of how sex trafficking has changed over the course of the last few decades and what it entails, the tactics, groups of sex traffickers, and how people are sold into sex trafficking

Paragraph 6: Comparison of sex trafficking in south Asia and the United States

Conclusion: Sex Trafficking is relevant in today’s society because it is still prevalent issue going on in most countries around the world. The Asian continent is one of the heaviest populated places on Earth so naturally it is breeding ground for trouble. Everyday individuals are taken, lured, and misguided into the crevices of society in Asian culture to be sexually abused and raped against their will. The idea of exchanging sexual actions for money is bad enough, but forcing individuals into an industry of sexual dominated patriarchy is the worst form of slavery there is.

 

Huda, S. “Sex Trafficking in South Asia”. International Journal of Genecology Obstetrics, 94, No.3  (July 17, 2006): 374-81. Acsessed February, 21, 2017. doi: 10.1016/ligo.2006.04.027.

Kuo, Michelle. “Asia’s Dirty Secret.” World In Review, July 1, 2000. Accessed February, 21, 2017.

Snyder, Paul. Prostitution in Asia. Vol.10.Series 2. Taylor and Francis Ltd, 1974.

Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similiar to Slavery. Yale Law School, 1956.

UN project combats human trafficking is Southeast Asia. ” Provincial , May 14, 2014.  Accessed January 19, 2017. http://search.proquest.com/docview/154165791? accountid=14902

 

Revised Geographic Focus: Thailand, South Asia, Japan

Revised Search Terms: human trafficking, southeast asia, prostitution, sex trafficking, rape, Asians, sex workers

Revised Date Limiter: 1960-1979

Revised Historical Question: How has sex trafficking evolved throughout history in Asia and what are the key differences and affects between sex trafficking and prostitution?

 

(Revised LRA #2) / Sex Trafficking in Asia

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The primary source I have chosen relates to the history of my topic, which is sex trafficking in Asia. The primary source is a legal document called, “Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery”  and written September, 7th, 1956. This source talks about the history of slave trade which is the origin of sex trafficking, and eventually sex trafficking evolved from slave trade in the sense of humans being forced to work for another with their dignity being considered. This also shows how sex trafficking and slave trade have been regulated by the government throughout history. The document reaches out or is intended to be read by people in law enforcement such as police officers and people whom are lawyers or victims of sex trafficking. The primary purpose is to protect victims of sex trafficking and slave trade, then to hopefully eliminate sexual exploitation in the future. This document’s historical context is related to the cause of ending of slavery and slave trade completely in the United States and in other countries such as in Asia. Considering the document was written in 1956 it was intended to read and activated immediately, affecting future generations. This particular source does not affiliate with one author, rather it is a bill that was most likely drafted by men people whom were of high economic standing and were scholars. The document was drafted to prevent wrongful abuse sexual or labor of humans typically, colored or of a different nationality or low economic standing. What can be read in between the lines is that document is meant to create and provoke change to free citizens to be of equality. Living in a world of where slavery in any format whether for labor, abuse, or sexual purposes still exists means equality can never be achieved until the metaphorical chains and relinquished.

Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similiar to Slavery. Yale Law School, 1956.

Geographic Focus: Thailand, Japan, Asia,

Search terms: sex trafficking, sex tourism, slavery, slave trade, rape, sexual assault, sexual abuse

Primary Source Database: The Avalon Project

Primary Source Search Date Limiter: 1950-1979

Historical Questions:

Question A: How did this document affect sex trafficking in other countries relating to the abolishment of slavery in the Unites States?

Question B: How has this document affected sex trafficking today, in terms of delaying or decreasing sexual exploitation around the world?

 

 

Sex Trafficking in Asia (LRA 2)

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Sex Trafficking or more commonly known as ‘Sex Tourism’ before the most recent decades, results carry an abundance of negative affects. Individuals and children inducted into sex trafficking are often harmed, raped, injured, or killed within the process.  The primary source I have chosen to use is a book called, Sex, Power, and Slavery by Gwyn Campbell and Elizabeth Elbourne written in 1952. The book expands on the topic of sexual exploitation and how this differs across different societies. The book is aimed toward to the public who desire to be more informed about the topic in hopes of learning and/or decreasing the amount of sex trafficking. The dedicated purpose of the source is to educate and expand the horizons of sexual exploitations in the form of rape and abuse of power within cultures. The historical context expressed in the book touches on the time between the beginning of slavery and what sex trafficking is in today’s society. More specifically, slavery began in the early 1800’s which derived into forms of sexual abuse and overpowering which has cultivated into an industry in some sorts. Sex, Power, and Slavery had many contributors along with the primary authors whom were female. This large amount of contributors entails many views and perspectives of both men and women from different socioeconomic classes, naturally giving a more rounded and realistic viewpoint of the topic. The source entails that sex trafficking is real world issue that is prominent in society that is often ignored and neglected and the authors are trying to shine a light on the problem. The domination over others to abuse, rape, and over power individuals has and is becoming too much of a prevalent issue.

 

Gwen Campbell and Elizabeth Elbourne: sex, power, and slavery  1950-1979 (Ohio University Press2015)

 

Geographic focus: Thailand, Southeast Asia, Japan

Search Terms: sex trafficking, sex tourism, rape, slavery, children, abuse

Primary Source Search Date Limiter: The range for  the primary source chosen is 1950-1979.

Historical Research Questions: How do sex trafficking and slavery compare? How did slavery diverge into a new form of exploitation regarding sex trafficking and loss free will via the victims?

 

Sex Trafficking in Asia

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There  is a global issue spreading rapidly that attention needs to be called to, affecting the human population in the shadows. Sex trafficking has again and again become a reoccurring problem, especially in the larger cities, behind closed doors. This is exploitation of men, women, and children for sexual use almost in ‘slave like conditions’. Sex trafficking is not a matter of will, rather a matter of force. Most individuals are taken, kidnapped, lead or even sold into trafficking in this respect. In Asia, this matter is growing rapidly everyday, the major hubs of Asia such as Tai Wan, Vietnam, or Hong Kong. Many are working hard to prevent sex trafficking and locate the trade, “HA NOI, A five-year regional project to fight human trafficking across Southeast Asia was launched in Ha Noi.” The goal is to end sex trafficking and the ideology of modern day slavery, except the object desired is not later but human sexuality.

UN project combats human trafficking is Southeast Asia. ” Provincial , May 14, 2014.  Accessed January 19, 2017. http://search.proquest.com/docview/154165791? accountid=14902

Geographic focus: (southeast asia) Tai Wan, Hong Kong, Vietnam

Search Terms: human trafficking, southeast asia, prostitution,

 

Breanna Crone LRA #1 January 19 2017  M/W/F 1:10-2 pm